TAMU Commerce Colony Commemorates Black History Month; Leads Charge on TangoTab Service Effort to Combat Hunger in DFW

In alignment with the brotherhood’s core belief in service; entities around the nation spent their Saturdays giving back to the communities they are part of. The Texas A&M University, Commerce colony had a busy weekend participating in several efforts on their campus and in the greater Dallas/Ft Worth area.

On Friday, the brothers participated in the Commerce High School Black History Month program where they performed some strolls for the eager high school students and the community. Strolling, a traditional line dance routine, originated by Historically Black Greek Lettered Organizations has become a staple of Greek Life throughout. The practice has historical significance and being that the TAMUC colony is predominantly composed of African American brothers, they felt it was important to showcase the art of strolling and its history as well, with the students and community at Commerce High School.

February is designated as Black History Month where the contributions of Black Americans is highlighted and celebrated. The TAMUC colony along with other entities in ODPhi honor that legacy, that contribution, and that history by participating in events such as these. The Beta Theta chapter at Texas A&M- San Antonio recently participated in the Alamo City’s MLK March for Freedom which pays tribute to the late Dr. King and his message that “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere”.

Aside from paying tribute to this important history, the brothers at the Texas A&M Commerce kept busy and continued to serve throughout the weekend. On Saturday morning, they participated in TangoTab’s Feed the City initiative in partnership with the Dallas start up company. TangoTab is a mobile app that allows those who join the opportunity to check in at varied restaurants and locales and in doing so, donates a meal through TangoTab.

According to its website, TangoTab receives a small fee for every check in from that specific restaurant; that fee goes on to provide one free meal through a local food organization. In Dallas/Ft Worth, TangoTab has a partnership with both the North Texas Food Bank and the Tarrant Area Food Bank. The efforts through TangoTab, its partners, its volunteers, and customers allow the issue of hunger to be brought to the forefront and for an actual plan of action to combat it to be implemented.

Brian Jones, current active of the TAMUC Colony, stumbled across this service effort by chance but it has definitely become a staple for the Alpha Iota colony. The brothers from AI drove an hour and a half from Commerce to Downtown Dallas to be able to participate in this Feed the City effort.

During the event, volunteers and organizers met at a Deep Ellum restaurant/bar where they made sandwiches and packaged lunches that would, in turn, be delivered to local food organizations and homeless shelters in Dallas. The work consisted of setting up an assembly line where the sandwiches were prepared, packaged in multiples of twenty for efficient counting, and transport and delivery to the SoupMobile where they were distributed to homeless shelters in the area.

“Helping out our community, no matter how big or small, is important to us. So driving an hour or two out of our way to see the needs of our vulnerable populations met makes it well worth it.” said TAMUC Active Joseph Villegas, who crossed in the Fall of 2016.

Brother Tobasia Griffiths, Spring 2017 initiate, said that the event is far-reaching and makes a direct impact because it benefits anyone who suffers from hunger. He explained that hunger affects people from all aspects of life, anyone can go hungry.

The Commerce brothers rounded out there weeekend by supporting and attending the Mitu Voting Pop Up rally cosponsored by State Representative Victoria Neave, Mitu, the DFWAA of Omega Delta Phi, and the DFWAA of Sigma Lambda Gamma National Sorority, Inc. 

Mitu sponsored the event where they had games, food, entertainment, and interesting displays showcasing the importance of voting in local, state, and federal elections as well as the power of the Latino vote.